Psoriasis

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Letting It Out: A Couch, Tears & Kleenex

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Secondhand Smoke: Impairing Children’s Cough Reflex?

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Lactose Intolerance

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

listen now

Atrial Fibrillation:
Getting Back In Rhythm

Guests: Dr. Marcus Wharton, MD; artist Barry Manilow
Host: Christopher Springmann
Show Theme: Listen, read and share this Life Love & Health program as Dr. Wharton explains with great clarity the symptoms of and treatments for atrial fibrillation or AFib.

Loading the player …


Myth: Heart rate and heart rhythm are the same thing.
Fact: The rate and rhythm of your heart are different. Rate refers to the speed of your heart beat while rhythm is the pattern of the beat. AFib causes the heart to race and beat out of rhythm.

There are three main goals in treating AFib: getting your heart back in rhythm, slowing a racing heart rate and preventing stroke.

Myth: If I don’t feel any symptoms, my heart is beating in rhythm.
Fact: Even if you do not experience symptoms, your heart may still be out of rhythm. In fact, as many as 30 percent of people with AFib do not feel any symptoms.

This is why if you have AFib it’s important to stay in regular contact with your healthcare
provider and stay abreast of your condition. There can be serious consequences to your heart being out of rhythm, including permanent heart damage, heart failure, heart attack, stroke or death.

Myth: Having AFib means I can no longer enjoy an active lifestyle.
Fact: While some people with AFib are limited by their disease and symptoms, many can still lead an active lifestyle. Exercise is usually beneficial for someone with AFib because it has a positive effect on mood and can help keep weight controlled, which is good for the heart. It’s important to check diet, exercise and other lifestyle habits, and discuss your personal AFib medical treatment plan with a healthcare provider.

   

“Our body sends us messages continually about the state of our health, and if you feel your heart start to skip a beat or a fluttering feeling in your chest, you should take that message seriously. We’ll first hear atrial fibrillation patient and music icon Barry Manilow discuss his serious heart condition; then, we’ll be joined by prominent heart specialist, Dr. Marcus Wharton.”

John Marcus Wharton, M.D., is Professor of Medicine with Tenure and Director of Cardiac Electrophysiology at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, South Carolina. Dr. Wharton received his M.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tennessee, and completed an internship and residency at the University of California at San Francisco. He then completed his cardiology fellowship at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, and subsequently served as Assistant Professor of Medicine, Director of Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology, and Associate Professor of Medicine with Tenure there. Among his many awards and honors are the Albert Weinstein Prize in Medicine and the North American Society of Pacing and Electrophysiology (NASPE) Young Investigator Award. Dr. Wharton has also been named among The Best Doctors in America, 2001-2002, and Best Doctors in North Carolina, 2002, by Business North Carolina. Read more . . .